Restore Liver Support

• Metabolism and Absorption of Lipids in the Intestine

• TUDCA increases glucose-induced insulin release via the cAMP/PKA pathway, increasing insulin sensitivity

• TUDCA relieves endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The ER makes sure proteins are folded properly

• TUDCA reduces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in healthy cells. TUDCA prevents the molecule BAX from reaching the mitochondria. BAX causes mitochondria to release cytochrome C, which causes enzymes (caspases) to initiate apoptosis

• TUDCA inactivates Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD), a molecule involved in apoptosis

• TUDCA removes toxic bile acids from the liver and prevents them from damaging liver cells

Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is the taurine conjugate of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a US Food and Drug Administration-approved hydrophilic bile acid for the treatment of certain cholestatic liver diseases.

These bile acids are chemical chaperones, improving the general chaperone defense, and thus serve to support an epigenetic mechanism of possible significance for the evolution of mammalian longevity, as well as for the attainment of healthy aging.

If you have had your gallbladder removed or have liver and or gallbladder complications, you are now causing the under production of bile salts. Fat soluble vitamins and fatty acids can’t be absorbed very well. They now will cause problems as they go to the colon and can cause diarrhea and other problems.

However, the liver can replace damaged tissue with new sister cells. The liver will repair completely after 30 days if no complications arise. Now, we have an aging process that has been accelerated. If we continue to push and rely on the constant natural repair of tissue, we will get to the end of the Hayflick limits of the tissue and organ.

Bile acids are detergent molecules derived from cholesterol in the liver that are important for the metabolism and absorption of lipids in the intestine. In order to set up the attainment of healthy aging, it needs to be understood that the bile acids alleviate constipation, are inhibitory to the formation of gallstones, and counteract the formation of amyloid. The observation that the bile acid serum level in hominids is 5-fold higher than in dogs and cats. This suggests a contribution of the bile acids in the evolution of mammalian longevity.

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which can be attenuated by treatment with our Restore Liver Support. Conversely, the levels of inflammatory gene expression were reduced by the activation of autophagy or by the inhibition of ER stress.

Also, Restore Liver Support can cause a malfunction of the ER stress response caused by aging, genetic mutations, or environmental factors can result in various diseases such as diabetes, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and bipolar disorder

Bile acids are detergent molecules derived from cholesterol in the liver that are important for the metabolism and absorption of lipids in the intestine. Bile acids are also steroid hormones activating Bionomic Solutions

specific nuclear receptors and G protein coupled receptors. Our bile acids are cytoprotective and anticarcinogenic. Bile acid synthesis and bile flow decreases notably as we age.

This brings us to Bile Acid Supplementation in Aging.

The progressive age-related reduction in bile acid synthesis, associated with impairment of the chaperone defense, can be counteracted by oral replacement therapy, preferably by use of the chaperone Restore Liver Support with molecular chaperones are stress response proteins, important for the processes of folding, maintenance, and repair of proteins, RNA, and DNA, as well as for the structure and function of the steroid hormone receptors. The level of expression of the molecular chaperones correlate with mammalian longevity as well as with the life span of differentiated cells. The functions of the chaperone machinery are progressively impaired during aging, and the progressive age-related

impairment of these housekeeping mechanisms probably contributes to the phenotype of aging. This review presents evidence that Restore Liver Support bile acids are chemical chaperones, improving the general chaperone defense, and thus serve to support an epigenetic mechanism of possible significance for the evolution of mammalian longevity, as well as for the attainment of healthy aging.

 

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